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Flash! Adobe Premiere Pro to Audition Bug

It’s not often we run aground on a bug that’s been going on for a while in an Adobe product. Feature wish? Sure. Nasty bug? No. But we’ve bottomed out the ship on this one trying to integrate Premiere Pro with Audition via Dynamic Linking. So here’s a little “what’s up” with a potentially brutal Premiere to Audition Bug and how to fix it.

The Basics

Dynamic Linking between Adobe Audition, Premiere Pro and Media Encoder, I pray, will soon be the solution to all of

The last thing you want to see your high sample rate files converted to: 8 kHz.

our conforming issues. It’s already so incredibly useful for post workflows, because it’s the only round trip system which allows NLE audio to be perfectly dropped into a DAW session with all automation, track colors, panning, native plugins and more. It also incorporates online use of the video elements such that any edits in the Premiere/NLE timeline automatically update the movie in Audition/DAW. To make matters even better, once you’re done with the audio in Audition and the video in Premiere, you can Dynamic link both to Media Encoder from Audition and create any kind of deliverables you want with the click of a mouse. So dope.

In a process so unfathomably complex there’s bound to be issues, and for the most part, we, the users, no longer deal with any of them as long as you don’t mess around with the location of the shared resources on your drive.

Except for this: if you have high sample rate audio files in your Premiere timeline, although they’ll play fine in PP, if you attempt to dynamically link them into Audition, they will show up in sync and looking fine, but transcoded to 8 kHz. Yeah. Brutal. This is true for files at 96 and 192 kHz. Let me tell you, this is great news if you like the sound of original Nintendo audio, but if you’re looking for a perfect transition from PP to AA with you über amazing high sample rate files, you’re in for a poke in the eye – and ear – with some low bit rate sound.

In speaking with the Audition development team, they maintain that it’s solely a Premiere issue and those folks maintain that no one uses high sample rate audio files in Premiere timelines. Well. Aux Contraire. Does anyone really record at 48K anymore?

The Workaround
All is not lost, of course – although the extra bandwidth you recorded in your 192 kHz file will be. The workaround is to transcode your audio files down to 48 kHz, and then the dynamic linking – and PP – read and transfer those files easily. But what a drag, right? BTW, the program to use to do the transcoding is – you guessed it – Media Encoder which can happily, and in bulk, transcode those files into anything you want.

Hopefully, the good folks at Premiere development will get the hint that professional audio isn’t moving into high sample rate files, it’s moved already – and resolve this bug with all haste.

If you’ve got a better workaround, boy, we’re all ears and eyes! Let us know how you’ve gotten around this here in this blog post or on the forum.

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Be sure to check out our articles on Surround Sound here:

Quick Start to Mixing in 5.1 and Higher

Surround Mixing in 5.1 – Revealed

5.1 Surround Sound – The Right Speaker Placement

5 Reasons to Mix Everything In 5.1 Surround (Even if you never deliver that way)

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